According to a New Study, Alligators Can Regrow Their Massive Tails

Recently, scientists have made an amazing new discovery that young alligators can regrow their tails, which are nearly 20% of their total body length. The researchers speculate that this regrowth ability gives alligators a functional advantage in their habitats. Using advanced imaging technology, the team of interdisciplinary scientists showed that alligators have the same regenerative capabilities as most smaller reptiles.

Unlike Smaller Reptiles, Alligators Have to Regrow a Massive Tail

Alligators in Captivity
According to a New Study, Alligators Can Regrow Their Massive Tails

Small reptiles are known to regrow their tails, but alligators have a potential body length of fourteen feet, and scientists were not sure if they could regrow their massive tails. Now, researchers have found out that young alligators can actually regrow their tails. Apparently, the new tails are complex structures that have a central skeleton with cartilage and connective tissue, interlaced with nerves and blood vessels.

The regrown tail exhibits signs of wound healing and regeneration, and the regrowth of cartilage, blood vessels, nerves, and scales is consistent with other lizard tail regeneration studies. Scientists were also surprised to find scar-like connective tissue instead of skeletal muscle. Studies on tail regeneration have been going on for decades because alligators, humans, and lizards belong to the same group of backbone animals called amniotes. The new discovery leads to questions about the possibilities for the future and the history of regeneration.

Researchers Hope the New Finding Will Lead to Future Medical Discoveries

Link between dinosaurs and birds
According to a New Study, Alligators Can Regrow Their Massive Tails

The researchers who made the new findings see a lot of potential for future discoveries, including new therapeutic approaches to treating diseases like arthritis and repairing injuries. The hope is that understanding how different species of animals can regenerate their tissues will allow scientists to leverage this knowledge and develop new medical therapies.

The new finding has also left scientists with an open question regarding alligators, birds, and their common ancestors. While alligators have managed to keep the cellular machinery that allows them to regenerate complex tails, birds seem to have lost it in their evolutionary path. The question is, when did that happen? And could there be fossils of bird-related dinosaurs with regrown tails that would reveal clues to that time period?

Forecasters Have Predicted a Very Active Hurricane Season

Hurricane season typically takes place from the beginning of June until the end of November. This year, the season will be quite active in the tropical Atlantic compared to previous seasons, according to several forecasters, due to the warm ocean temperatures.

2020 Atlantic hurricane predictions
Forecasters Have Predicted a Very Active Hurricane Season

Hurricane Predictions for 2020

The predictions for this season include 18 named storms, and 9 of them being hurricanes, which are set to start on June 1st. The Weather Channel, which is owned by IBM, makes these predictions every year and typically has an average of 12 named storms, six of them being hurricanes. These predictions are made possible by the U.S. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration.

Of the 9 hurricanes for this season, four are expected to be “major hurricanes” according to the Weather Channel. A “major hurricane” consists of Category 3 or higher and should have sustained winds of a minimum of 111 miles per house.

The Research Behind the Predictions

Hurricane Predictions for 2020
Forecasters Have Predicted a Very Active Hurricane Season

There are other researches, like forecasters from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, along with those at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and risk experts from University College London that have also predicted above-normal hurricane activity for 2020.

All three groups of researchers reported high sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, which is the reason behind the predicted activity. The warm and moist air that evaporates from the ocean is like fuel for hurricanes as it pumps water into the atmosphere, which then gets carried to higher levels by winds until it rains. This releases more heat and pushes the cycle forward.

The sea-surface temperatures of the tropical Atlantic this year are forecasted to be some of the warmest since 1993. This year was the first time researchers at the University of Arizona released their forecasts for the hurricane season in April instead of June.